Teaching

National University of Singapore

QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS (FALL 2018)
Communications and New Media, Cultural Studies, graduate

Bulletin Description
This module is designed to help graduate students understand what qualitative communication research is, questions of design in qualitative communication research, and the steps in carrying out qualitative research projects. It covers fundamental concepts in qualitative research design, sampling strategies, data generation, data analysis, evaluation, writing and performance. This module also introduces basic concepts of qualitative methods such as interpretation, meaning making, reflexivity, poetics, and co-construction. A set of field based experiences will be designed to give students opportunities to become familiar with specific forms of qualitative data gathering such as in-depth interviews, focus groups, and ethnography.

Objectives
This interdisciplinary seminar offers an introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, media studies, and cultural studies. We will employ a praxis-centered approach throughout the semester by executing and workshopping weekly practica (hands-on) assignments. Special attention will be paid to research approaches that promote diversity and inclusivity. We will explore how these approaches shape our own practices, experiences, and interventions in research on contemporary society. This is an intensive seminar and therefore will involve a significant amount of reading, synthesis, and writing.

 Stony Brook University (SUNY)

As Instructor of Record:

GENDERS AND SEXUALITIES IN EAST ASIA (SPRING 2016)
Women’s and Gender Studies, upper division undergraduate
Evaluation: 4.61/5

This course is designed to introduce students to shifting notions of gender and sexuality in East Asia. Instead of understanding nation, culture, gender, and sexuality as static (as these terms tend to reinforce), we will study East Asia as a contested region of heterogeneous cultures, languages, and peoples in which diverse forms of genders and sexualities proliferate. To this end, we will draw on approaches from different fields, such as East Asian studies, cultural anthropology, and women’s and gender studies. We will explore the production of gendered, sexual, and national bodies, desires, and identities in East Asia within the following overarching topics: social movements and academic discourses, sex, gender and (affective) labor, and media and popular cultures.


INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE POPULAR CULTURE (FALL 2015)
Cultural Studies/Women’s and Gender Studies, upper division undergraduate
Evaluation: 4.85/5 (Cultural Studies), 4.73/5 (Women’s and Gender Studies).

This course (conducted in English) is designed to introduce students to Japan’s vibrant mass and popular cultural scene. We will examine multiple forms of Japanese mass and popular culture ranging from the Edo period (1603-1868) to contemporary era using approaches from different disciplines, such as cultural studies, Japanese studies, and women’s and gender studies. We will explore the production of racial, class, gendered, sexual, and national bodies, desires, and identities in Japan within the following domains: the mass media, affective labor, cute/girl culture, anime, manga, pornography, fandom, race, and popular music.


INTRODUCTION TO QUEER STUDIES IN THE HUMANITIES (SPRING 2015)
Women’s and Gender Studies, lower division undergraduate
Evaluation: 4.42/5

This introductory course examines the study of queer(ness) and sexualities situated in specific cultural, geographical, and historical contexts using interdisciplinary and transnational approaches. We will interrogate shifting understandings of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and “straight” as theory, practice, and identity, dealing with one or more of the following domains: race, dis/ability, sports, the media, performativity, pornography, transnational sexualities, bodies and subjectivities. This course is designed to expose students to the themes, methods, and questions pertaining to queer studies, and draw connections between them and their everyday lives.


INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES (SUMMER 2016; SUMMER 2015; SUMMER 2014) 
Women’s and Gender Studies, lower division undergraduate, fully online
Evaluation: 4.33/5 (2016), 4.19/5 (2015), 4.33/5 (2014)

This introductory course to women’s and gender studies is taught entirely in the virtual classroom and examines the study of gender using interdisciplinary and transnational approaches. We will explore the production of gendered bodies, identities, and desires situated in specific cultural, geographical, and historical contexts, dealing with one or more of the following domains: histories of Western science and medicine, the construction of sexual and racial difference, identity politics and nationalism, colonialism, imperialism, laws, activism within and across borders, body politics and medical tourism, transnational labor flows, media representation, popular culture, sports, and dis/ability. This course is designed to expose students to the themes, methods, and questions pertaining to women’s and gender studies, and draw connections between them and their everyday lives.


As Teaching Assistant:
HISTORIES OF FEMINISM (FALL 2014) 
Women’s and Gender Studies, upper division undergraduate (no formal evaluation)
Instructor: Nancy Hiemstra

A core seminar for majors that examines the historical developments of contemporary feminism, focusing mostly on the United States context.


INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES (SPRING 2014) 
Women’s and Gender Studies, lower division undergraduate (4.74/5)
Instructor: Francoise Cromer

A survey course to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Women’s and Gender Studies. As one of three teaching assistants, I managed a weekly recitation section of 39 students.


INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES (FALL 2013)
Women’s and Gender Studies, lower division undergraduate (4.09/5)
Instructor: Victoria Hesford

An introductory course surveying Women’s and Gender Studies scholarship and interdisciplinarity as a cluster of methods—literary, historical, theoretical, and sociological—used to analyze and interpret social and cultural phenomena. As one of three teaching assistants, I managed a weekly recitation section of 33 students.


SEXUALITY IN LITERATURE (SPRING 2013) 
Humanities, lower division undergraduate (no formal evaluation)
Instructor: Patrice Nganang

An introductory course on the treatment of sexuality in literature, drawing on film, the arts, and literary and theoretical texts. As one of three teaching assistants, I managed a weekly recitation section of 23 students.


SEX AND SEXUALITY IN LITERATURE (FALL 2012)
Humanities, lower division undergraduate (no formal evaluation)
Instructor: Robert Harvey

A survey course exploring the expression and interpretation of sex and sexuality in art and literature. As one of three teaching assistants, I managed a weekly recitation section of 40 students.